WHY STYLISTS LEAVE THEIR SALON

Hey Salon Owners! It's NEVER a good thing when you have a stylist say... Hey can we talk in your office! YIKES! What typically comes after, is usually a two week notice. And then your mind starts swirling what do you do about schedules, the clients, the rest of the team, and I could go on. 

As a salon owner and leader, in some cases, you are the last person to know that a team member is not happy. Why is that? As a salon leader it is your responsibility to take care of your team. Listen to them, include them, commutate with them, appreciate them, value their opinion, and most importantly, get their feedback. When you are a salon owner you basically are serving your team, just like your team is serving your clients. Remember, it all starts with you! 

So I did some homework for you. I polled hundreds of stylists from all over the country, to find out why they left their previous salon, and what they felt were their deal breakers in the salons they worked at over the years.

Are you curious to find out the top 5 reasons why stylists leave their salon? Here is what they said.......

  1. Not enough education. This is a big one with more than 50% of stylists voting this for number 1. They felt like the salon owner did not invest in enough in salon education. It was because the owner did not want to invest the money, or it just wasn't important to them. 
  2. Lack of Leadership. They felt the salon owner was not invested in growing them or the business. They felt like even though they were in a commissioned salon, they had no one to give them any direction on how to grow their business behind the chair. Systems were not implemented, and in most cases the team did whatever they wanted. 
  3. The salon was constantly out of product. Not retail product, but hair color and lightener. This really seemed to frustrate mosts stylists. From mixing colors together, having no developer, to not having ANY LIGHTNER! WHAT? 
  4. The salon owner did not listen to them. They felt like if they had a problem or an issue that the salon owner in some cases would not make time to sit with them. If they did, they felt like nothing was ever taken care of. This also has to do with promotions They felt like they had great ideas, but the salon owner did not take the time to sit down and listen to them. 
  5. The salon owner played favorites. OH BOY! They felt like the stylists that made the most money,pretty much got way with anything. They did not feel it was fair and in most cases they ended up leaving because they felt like they were undervalued and not appreciated. In most of the feedback I received, this one seemed to really anger the stylists. 

Did you notice the top 5 had nothing to do with money or compensation? Not that money doesn't matter, but it's not at the for front. If stylist are included, valued, listened, to, appreciated, challenged, and have room for growth, they will stay with you for the long haul! I have to add this. I am a big believer in everyone doing their part. The salon owner has to be a leader and the team has to show up and do their part as well. 50/50 if you will. One of the biggest parts of being a leader is inspiring others, but it is also holding people accountable.
My advice. Always leave the lines of communication open with your team. They should really feel like they can come to you with anything. Have monthly team meetings, where they can openly share their feelings and feedback. AND! Have one on one coaching sessions once a month. This creates a bond on a deeper level than just them working "for" you. It builds loyalty and trust, to create a very long lasting relationship between you and your team members. 
And remember. "They way you treat your team, is the way they will treat your customers."


 

Nina Tulio